Carole Radziwill

The Widow's Guide to Sex & Dating

Coming Soon From Carole Radziwill: The Widow's Guide to Sex & Dating - A Novel

Witty and charming... a delight. The character of Claire is [a] modern-day Holly Golightly.

—Candace Bushnell

Claire Byrne is a quirky and glamorous 34-year-old Manhattanite and the wife of a famous, slightly older man. Her husband, Charlie, is a renowned sexologist and writer. Equal parts Alfred Kinsey and Warren Beatty, Charlie is pompous yet charming, supportive yet unfaithful; he's a firm believer that sex and love can't coexist for long, and he does little to hide his affairs. Claire's life with Charlie is an always interesting if not deeply devoted one, until Charlie is struck dead one day on the sidewalk by a falling sculpture ... a Giacometti, no less!

Once a promising young writer, Claire had buried her ambitions to make room for Charlie's. After his death, she must reinvent herself. Over the course of a year, she sees a shrink (or two), visits an oracle, hires a "botanomanist," enjoys an erotic interlude (or ten), eats too little, drinks too much, dates a hockey player, dates a billionaire, dates an actor (not any actor either, but the handsome movie star every woman in the world fantasizes about dating). As she grieves for Charlie and searches for herself, she comes to realize that she has an opportunity to find something bigger than she had before—maybe even, possibly, love.


Share this:

Witty and charming... a delight. The character of Claire is a modern-day Holly Golightly.

—Candace Bushnell

Claire Byrne is a quirky and glamorous 34-year-old Manhattanite and the wife of a famous, slightly older man. Her husband, Charlie, is a renowned sexologist and writer. Equal parts Alfred Kinsey and Warren Beatty, Charlie is pompous yet charming, supportive yet unfaithful; he's a firm believer that sex and love can't coexist for long, and he does little to hide his affairs. Claire's life with Charlie is an always interesting if not deeply devoted one, until Charlie is struck dead one day on the sidewalk by a falling sculpture ... a Giacometti, no less!

Once a promising young writer, Claire had buried her ambitions to make room for Charlie's. After his death, she must reinvent herself. Over the course of a year, she sees a shrink (or two), visits an oracle, hires a "botanomanist," enjoys an erotic interlude (or ten), eats too little, drinks too much, dates a hockey player, dates a billionaire, dates an actor (not any actor either, but the handsome movie star every woman in the world fantasizes about dating). As she grieves for Charlie and searches for herself, she comes to realize that she has an opportunity to find something bigger than she had before—maybe even, possibly, love.

Share this:

Events

Join Carole Radziwill for a reading and signing of The Widow's Guide to Sex & Dating!

Share this:

Media

Carole Radziwill interviewed on Good Morning America

Carole Radziwill interviewed on The View

Carole Radziwill interviewed on Morning Joe

Share this:

Carole Radziwill interviewed on Good Morning America

Carole Radziwill interviewed on The View

Carole Radziwill interviewed on Morning Joe

Share this:

The Rules Contest

My new book, The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating is in stores now!

So much of the fun of writing is connecting with people, and hearing their stories. It's inspiring, funny, and often rewarding to tell your stories, isn't it? Especially the ones you've never told anyone before.

So I want to hear yours! You don't have to be a widow, or a woman, or a Housewife, or anything in particular at all.

Here's the deal:

Scattered throughout my book (and my brain) are a number of relationship RULES. Some of them are useful tips I've heard, some are smart advice, some are just quirky little things to make you laugh.

Each week I'm going to post one of those RULES, give you a bit of background and then I want YOU to write about it -- on your blog, Facebook or Twitter (hashtag #WidowsGuide). Email me the link to your post and I'll feature and promote the best ones. You can also post your story directly to my facebook fan page.

This week's rule:

BEWARE OF PREDATORS POSING AS PUPPIES.

Do you agree? Write something about what this means to you -- a personal experience, or even a story someone has shared with you. Remember -- you don't have to be a widow, or a woman, or a Housewife, or anything in particular at all.

Remember, please send the link to your post to: rules@caroleradziwill.com and put RULES in the Subject line.

And each week one of you will win a signed galley copy of The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating from me.

Can't wait to hear from you!

xo, C

Share this:

My new book, The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating is in stores now!

So much of the fun of writing is connecting with people, and hearing their stories. It's inspiring, funny, and often rewarding to tell your stories, isn't it? Especially the ones you've never told anyone before.

So I want to hear yours! You don't have to be a widow, or a woman, or a Housewife, or anything in particular at all.

Here's the deal:

Scattered throughout my book (and my brain) are a number of relationship RULES. Some of them are useful tips I've heard, some are smart advice, some are just quirky little things to make you laugh.

Each week I'm going to post one of those RULES, give you a bit of background and then I want YOU to write about it -- on your blog, Facebook or Twitter (hashtag #WidowsGuide). Email me the link to your post and I'll feature and promote the best ones. You can also post your story directly to my facebook fan page.

This week's rule:

BEWARE OF PREDATORS POSING AS PUPPIES.

Do you agree? Write something about what this means to you -- a personal experience, or even a story someone has shared with you. Remember -- you don't have to be a widow, or a woman, or a Housewife, or anything in particular at all.

Remember, please send the link to your post to: rules@caroleradziwill.com and put RULES in the Subject line.

And each week one of you will win a signed galley copy of The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating from me.

Can't wait to hear from you!

xo, C

Share this:

Excerpt

Download this excerpt as a PDF

Charles Byrne, Sexologist and Writer, Dies at 54
by Mark Iocolano, The New York Times

Charles Byrne, renowned sexologist and author of the National Book Award–winning Thinker’s Hope, as well as several pivotal studies on sexual norms and morality, died Monday from a head injury incurred at Madison Avenue near 61st Street, according to a statement issued by his longtime publisher, Knopf.

Charles Fisher Byrne grew up in Bristol, Connecticut, the only son of socialite Grace Thornton and the late Honorable Franz Byrne, chief justice of the Connecticut Supreme Court.

Charles Byrne attended Princeton for both his graduate and undergraduate studies, and held several honorary degrees. He published his first academic paper on sexual paraphilia, called “Erotic Variations on a Theme,” his junior year. It contained the seeds of what was to become his most widely known theory, The Opposite of Sex, and launched the career of what is considered one of the preeminent voices in the field of contemporary sexology.

Read more

Share this:

Charles Byrne, Sexologist and Writer, Dies at 54
by Mark Iocolano, The New York Times

Charles Byrne, renowned sexologist and author of the National Book Award–winning Thinker’s Hope, as well as several pivotal studies on sexual norms and morality, died Monday from a head injury incurred at Madison Avenue near 61st Street, according to a statement issued by his longtime publisher, Knopf.

Charles Fisher Byrne grew up in Bristol, Connecticut, the only son of socialite Grace Thornton and the late Honorable Franz Byrne, chief justice of the Connecticut Supreme Court.

Charles Byrne attended Princeton for both his graduate and undergraduate studies, and held several honorary degrees. He published his first academic paper on sexual paraphilia, called “Erotic Variations on a Theme,” his junior year. It contained the seeds of what was to become his most widely known theory, The Opposite of Sex, and launched the career of what is considered one of the preeminent voices in the field of contemporary sexology.

Read more

Share this:

Characters

Charles “Charlie” Byrne
Charlie is Claire’s deceased husband who met his fate when a Giacometti statue fell from a Manhattan window. A famed writer and sexologist, Charlie was known for his hands-on research methods. Charlie’s death leaves Claire with questions, anxiety, and an unfinished manuscript.

Richard Ashe
Richard is a literary agent; more specifically he was Charlie’s long-suffering agent. Calm and authoritative, Richard helps Claire get her affairs in order following Charlie’s death. He also pushes her to finish Charlie’s manuscript.

Ethan Demming
Ethan is Claire’s close friend and he was also Charlie’s trusted assistant. He is an impeccable dresser and great listener. He is an essential support system for Claire following Charlie’s death.

Sasha Wyse
Sasha is Claire’s closet friend since college with a flair for drama, and alcohol. The wife of a wealthy businessman, Sasha recommends dates, drinks, and “second-opinion” shrinks to help Claire deal with widowhood.

Bridget
Bridget is Richard’s nervous, giggly young girlfriend. Along with Richard, she accompanies Claire on double dates, and to parties.

Jack Huxley
Hollywood actor and international symbol for sex, Jack is the subject of Charlie’s unfinished manuscript. When Claire takes over the writing project, she gets more than she bargained for from her subject.

Beatrice
Beatrice, a fortune-teller, is one of several people Claire seeks for insight and guidance. Beatrice is famous for predicting the relationship ups and downs of Manhattan’s elite. She sees interesting things in Claire’s future but warns her of danger.

Ben Hawthorne
Ben Hawthorne, a literary critic, once skewered one of Charlie’s books and, thus, fell out of Charlie’s good graces and setting off a rivalry that didn’t end with his death.

Derek Fountain
Derek is a Griot. What’s a Griot? It’s a sort of storyteller from a West African tradition. Richard recommends Derek’s services to Claire as a way to escape her troubles. Claire finds herself captivated by more than just Derek’s words.

Judith Lowenstein
Judith Lowenstein is Claire’s first shrink, though not always her favorite. When Lowenstein becomes irritable or fixates on Claire’s dreams, Claire finds herself seeking second opinions.

Evan Spence
Evan Spence is Claire’s “second-opinion” shrink, recommended by Sasha. Spence is not as uptight as Lowenstein, but he can be difficult to read

Share this:

Charles “Charlie” Byrne
Charlie is Claire’s deceased husband who met his fate when a Giacometti statue fell from a Manhattan window. A famed writer and sexologist, Charlie was known for his hands-on research methods. Charlie’s death leaves Claire with questions, anxiety, and an unfinished manuscript.

Richard Ashe
Richard is a literary agent; more specifically he was Charlie’s long-suffering agent. Calm and authoritative, Richard helps Claire get her affairs in order following Charlie’s death. He also pushes her to finish Charlie’s manuscript.

Ethan Demming
Ethan is Claire’s close friend and he was also Charlie’s trusted assistant. He is an impeccable dresser and great listener. He is an essential support system for Claire following Charlie’s death.

Sasha Wyse
Sasha is Claire’s closet friend since college with a flair for drama, and alcohol. The wife of a wealthy businessman, Sasha recommends dates, drinks, and “second-opinion” shrinks to help Claire deal with widowhood.

Bridget
Bridget is Richard’s nervous, giggly young girlfriend. Along with Richard, she accompanies Claire on double dates, and to parties.

Jack Huxley
Hollywood actor and international symbol for sex, Jack is the subject of Charlie’s unfinished manuscript. When Claire takes over the writing project, she gets more than she bargained for from her subject.

Beatrice
Beatrice, a fortune-teller, is one of several people Claire seeks for insight and guidance. Beatrice is famous for predicting the relationship ups and downs of Manhattan’s elite. She sees interesting things in Claire’s future but warns her of danger.

Ben Hawthorne
Ben Hawthorne, a literary critic, once skewered one of Charlie’s books and, thus, fell out of Charlie’s good graces and setting off a rivalry that didn’t end with his death.

Derek Fountain
Derek is a Griot. What’s a Griot? It’s a sort of storyteller from a West African tradition. Richard recommends Derek’s services to Claire as a way to escape her troubles. Claire finds herself captivated by more than just Derek’s words.

Judith Lowenstein
Judith Lowenstein is Claire’s first shrink, though not always her favorite. When Lowenstein becomes irritable or fixates on Claire’s dreams, Claire finds herself seeking second opinions.

Evan Spence
Evan Spence is Claire’s “second-opinion” shrink, recommended by Sasha. Spence is not as uptight as Lowenstein, but he can be difficult to read

Share this:

Praise

"One of the richest, most deeply satisfying stories I've read in a long time…[Radziwill's] spare writing and wry voice make The Widow's Guide an exhilarating, insightful and moving story about loss and identity."

BookPage

"Witty and charming, Carole Radziwill's first novel is a delight. I fell in love with the character of Claire—a modern-day Holly Golightly."

—Candace Bushnell, author of Sex and the City and The Carrie Diaries

"Carole Radziwill writes like a cross between Sophie Kinsella and Christopher Buckley. Widow's Guide is a sharp, flamboyant New York novel that revels in the tragicomic absurdities of the city. It's a smart take on Hollywood, too, with gorgeous movie stars and a quirky cast. Cautiously romantic, unexpectedly moving, and funny!"

—Susan Sarandon

"Glib, comic... [a] novel about a young Manhattan widow looking for love in all the wrong places... This may be a grief and recovery story for the privileged, but sharp-fanged Radziwill can be pretty funny.... Think Sex and the City in black."

Kirkus

"Claire never thought about the odds of losing her husband. But after a freak accident abruptly ends her husband's life, she is forced to wrestle with the question, "What next?" For the next year, Claire's life takes a wild turn... and somewhere in the middle of the madness, she begins to realize that her old life wasn't so perfect and perhaps this is all a blessing in disguise—a second chance at life and love. Verdict: Fans of authors such as Jane Green and Madeleine Wickham will enjoy this."

Library Journal

"Radziwill's delicious debut novel... is a poignant tale of love and loss."

Publishers Weekly

"The book's witty humor and Didion-esque raw language provide for a gripping read that triumphantly announces a profound new voice in literary fiction."

—Popbytes.com

"A hilarious account of a young widow's journey to find herself and re-establish her identity."

PW Show Daily

Share this:

"One of the richest, most deeply satisfying stories I've read in a long time…[Radziwill's] spare writing and wry voice make The Widow's Guide an exhilarating, insightful and moving story about loss and identity."

BookPage

"Witty and charming, Carole Radziwill's first novel is a delight. I fell in love with the character of Claire—a modern-day Holly Golightly."

—Candace Bushnell, author of Sex and the City and The Carrie Diaries

"Carole Radziwill writes like a cross between Sophie Kinsella and Christopher Buckley. Widow's Guide is a sharp, flamboyant New York novel that revels in the tragicomic absurdities of the city. It's a smart take on Hollywood, too, with gorgeous movie stars and a quirky cast. Cautiously romantic, unexpectedly moving, and funny!"

—Susan Sarandon

"Glib, comic... [a] novel about a young Manhattan widow looking for love in all the wrong places... This may be a grief and recovery story for the privileged, but sharp-fanged Radziwill can be pretty funny.... Think Sex and the City in black."

Kirkus

"Claire never thought about the odds of losing her husband. But after a freak accident abruptly ends her husband's life, she is forced to wrestle with the question, "What next?" For the next year, Claire's life takes a wild turn... and somewhere in the middle of the madness, she begins to realize that her old life wasn't so perfect and perhaps this is all a blessing in disguise—a second chance at life and love. Verdict: Fans of authors such as Jane Green and Madeleine Wickham will enjoy this."

Library Journal

"Radziwill's delicious debut novel... is a poignant tale of love and loss."

Publishers Weekly

"The book's witty humor and Didion-esque raw language provide for a gripping read that triumphantly announces a profound new voice in literary fiction."

—Popbytes.com

"A hilarious account of a young widow's journey to find herself and re-establish her identity."

PW Show Daily

Share this:

Interview with Carole Radziwill

The narrative voice in this novel is strong, fresh and unique. What are your literary inspirations?
--I will write as long as I have something to say in a way that hasn't quite been said before. Fitzgerald once said the cleverly expressed opposite of conventional wisdom is worth a fortune to somebody. I'm holding out for my fortune.

What inspired you to write a Widows Guide?
-- I originally thought of writing my memoir as a work of fiction but decided it wouldn't be believable as a novel. I wanted to explore the tragicomic side of loss. Also, novels give you a resolution you rarely find in life and that is comforting to me. I get to write the ending, and that is very satisfying.  

How was the process of writing this novel different than your 2005 memoir What Remains?
-- To be honest I thought fiction would be much easier than journalistic reporting or nonfiction writing, but I quickly found that it was much, much harder. You are only limited by the depth of your imagination and that was incredibly daunting. I kept thinking, I can come up with something more interesting than THAT. I think the burden of "truth" is greater in fiction. When I read memoir I'm conscious that it happened to someone so I take leaps of faith that I don't necessary do in fiction. So the level of detail, what Claire and the other characters wear, what they say, how they behave all  had to be perfectly consistent as to avoid false notes.

Read more

Share this:

The narrative voice in this novel is strong, fresh and unique. What are your literary inspirations?
--I will write as long as I have something to say in a way that hasn't quite been said before. Fitzgerald once said the cleverly expressed opposite of conventional wisdom is worth a fortune to somebody. I'm holding out for my fortune.

What inspired you to write a Widows Guide?
-- I originally thought of writing my memoir as a work of fiction but decided it wouldn't be believable as a novel. I wanted to explore the tragicomic side of loss. Also, novels give you a resolution you rarely find in life and that is comforting to me. I get to write the ending, and that is very satisfying.  

How was the process of writing this novel different than your 2005 memoir What Remains?
-- To be honest I thought fiction would be much easier than journalistic reporting or nonfiction writing, but I quickly found that it was much, much harder. You are only limited by the depth of your imagination and that was incredibly daunting. I kept thinking, I can come up with something more interesting than THAT. I think the burden of "truth" is greater in fiction. When I read memoir I'm conscious that it happened to someone so I take leaps of faith that I don't necessary do in fiction. So the level of detail, what Claire and the other characters wear, what they say, how they behave all  had to be perfectly consistent as to avoid false notes.

Read more

Share this:

Carole Radziwill

Carole Radziwill grew up in upstate New York and earned a BA at Hunter College and an MBA at New York University. She spent more than a decade at ABC News, reporting from around the world, and earned three Emmys. Her first book, What Remains, a memoir, spent over twenty weeks on the New York Times bestseller list. She has written for many magazines, including Marie Claire, Harper’s Bazaar, Glamour, Town & Country and Porter. She currently is a star of and "the voice of reason" on Bravo's The Real Housewives of New York.

Carole Radziwill Twitter   Carole Radziwill Facebook   Carole Radziwill Instagram

Share this:

Carole Radziwill grew up in upstate New York and earned a BA at Hunter College and an MBA at New York University. She spent more than a decade at ABC News, reporting from around the world, and earned three Emmys. Her first book, What Remains, a memoir, spent over twenty weeks on the New York Times bestseller list. She has written for many magazines, including Marie Claire, Harper’s Bazaar, Glamour, Town & Country and Porter. She currently is a star of and "the voice of reason" on Bravo's The Real Housewives of New York.

Carole Radziwill Twitter   Carole Radziwill Facebook   Carole Radziwill Instagram

Share this:

Buy the Book

The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating: A Novel by Carole Radziwill  The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating: A Novel by Carole Radziwill  The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating: A Novel by Carole Radziwill  The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating: A Novel by Carole Radziwill

The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating: A Novel by Carole Radziwill
The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating: A Novel by Carole Radziwill  The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating: A Novel by Carole Radziwill  The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating: A Novel by Carole Radziwill  The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating: A Novel by Carole Radziwill